YOU ARE STANDING AT THE END OF A ROAD BEFORE A SMALL BRICK BUILDING. AROUND YOU IS A FOREST. A SMALL STREAM FLOWS OUT OF THE BUILDING AND DOWN A GULLY.
What do these words mean?


What is Cyberculture?

These are the notes i compiled for an independent study project at NYU about anthropological and sociological views on "cyberculture," defined by Cyberculture Luxembourg as "a collection of cultures and cultural products that exist on and/or are made possible by the Internet, along with the stories told about these cultures and cultural products."

Since you are here, i imagine you have at least some interest in this thing called the internet. By virtue of even this small bit of participation in this non-geographic, horizontal, 'web'-like environment, you are touching an aspect of cyberculture.

Almost all of these words are the words of other people who know a lot more about all this than i do. Everything under an author's and essay's name was written in that essay by that author, and everything is attributed. Once in a while you will see my own rough comments in brackets.

If you've not skipped away by now, you must have some real desire to hear what people are thinking about these matters. I encourage you to read on, thoughtfully, and perhaps take this as a jumping-off point to explore these books, and the writings of these authors, more fully.


Articles:

From Welcome to Cyberia: Notes on the Anthropology of Cyberculture by Arturo Escobar. Current Anthropology, Volume 35, Number 3, June 1994.

From Maya Hackers and the Cyberspatialized Nation-State: Modernity, Ethnostalgia, and a Lizard Queen in Guatemala by Diane Nelson. Cultural Anthropology, Volume 11, Number 3, 1996, American Anthropological Association.



Books:

From technoscience and cyberculture edited by Stanley Aronowitz, Barbara Martinsons, and Michael Menser. Routledge, New York and London. 1996.

From Cyberspace: First Steps edited by Michael Benedikt. MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass. And London. 1991.

From Flame Wars: The Discourse on Cyberculture edited by Mark Dery. Duke University Press. Durham and London, 1994.

From Information Technologies and Social Transformation edited by Bruce R. Guile. National Academy of Sciences Symposium on Technology and Social Priorities, October 4, 1984. National Academy Press, Washington, DC. 1985.

From Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution by Stephen Levy. Anchor Press / Doubleday. New York, 1984.

From Connected: Engagements with Media edited by George Marcus. 1996. (one article)



Additional Links:

SocioSite: CYBERSPACE AND WEBSOCIOLOGY
This is a great and comprehensive site from the Universeteit van Amsterdam, where i studied in the Spring of 1998.

resource center for cyberculture studies
An excellent site; be sure to check out the annotated bibliography.

EFF "Net Culture & Cyber-Anthropology" Archive
A basic site and good "jumping-off" place.

ALT.CYBERPUNK FAQ
How "cyberpunks" view themselves. . .

Cyberpunk Dictionary
. . . and how they supposedly talk amongst themselves.

Digital Culture: Bibliography
A list of books of, for, by and and about cyberculture; includes some of the above books.

University of Illinois Department of English Presents: Cybercinema
These are films which can be considered part of cyberculture; they are not specifically about cyberculture.

Mark/Space: Anachron City: Cinema: Cyberpunk: Films
Another cyberfilm site.

Escape Velocity: Cyberculture at the End of the Century
A newer book by Mark Dery.

Sarah Zupko's Cultural Studies Center: Journals/Archives
Another list of reading material.

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