YOU ARE STANDING AT THE END OF A ROAD BEFORE A SMALL BRICK BUILDING. AROUND YOU IS A FOREST. A SMALL STREAM FLOWS OUT OF THE BUILDING AND DOWN A GULLY.

These are the opening words from the game Adventure, one of the first great computer games. I played it with my family when i was five years old, or thereabouts.

This is what Stephen Levy has to say about its origins in his famous book, Hackers:

A Stanford hacker named Donald Woods discovered a kind of game on a Xerox research computer one day that involved a spelunker-explorer seeking treasure in a dungeon. Woods contacted the programmer, Will Crowther, talked to him about it, and decided to expand Crowther's game into a full-scale "Adventure," where a person could use the computer to assume the role of a traveler in a Tolkienesque setting, fight off enemies, overcome obstacles through clever tricks, and eventually recover treasure. The player would give two-word, verb-noun commands to the program, which would respond depending on how the command changed the universe that had been created inside the computer by Don Woods' imagination. (Levy 1984:192)
So why would i put this at the start of this site? These were the words that introduced the world of computers to me, in a tiny green-on-black HP monitor. More importantly, they were the words that opened up a realm of exploration to anyone who wanted to "hack" through this fantasy world, this proto-cyberspace, in search of some distant treasure. I thought it only appropriate to greet explorers with this code.

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